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Pioneering black scientist to win ‘Nobel Prize’ of climate change

Yes, there is positive news that focuses on Black scientist. Warren Washington will be awarded the Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement. This is not only a step for Black progress, but for the world.

Warren

Warren Washington can trace at least one of the origins of his extraordinary scientific career —more than half a century of groundbreaking advances in computer climate modeling — to a youthful curiosity about the color of egg yolks.

“I had some wonderful teachers in high school, including a chemistry teacher who really got me started,” he said. “One day I asked her, ‘Why are egg yolks yellow?’ She said, ‘why don’t you find out?’” So he did. He still remembers the answer — the sulfur compounds in chicken feed become concentrated in the yolk, turning it yellow. “I also had an excellent physics teacher,” he said, describing why he became an atmospheric physicist.

Those teachers would be immensely proud of him today. Before the evolution of sophisticated computers, scientists knew little about the atmosphere other than what they could observe outright. Then a young black physicist came along, eager to use early computers to understand the workings of the Earth’s climate. He collaborated in creating the earliest computer climate models and went on to advise six presidents about climate change — Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. He was awarded the National Medal of Science in 2010 by President Obama. Washington, now 82, recently retired after 54 years at the National Center for Atmospheric Research, though it isn’t much of a retirement. He still continues to conduct research as a distinguished scholar.

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