The Vaudeville Mentality of Black Celebrities

The antics of plantation negroes have held Black America back 60 years, since the Civil Rights Movement with all the “nigga” lyrics and jokes told and sung by Black comedians, rappers, athletes and actors.

The Vaudeville Mentality of Black Celebrities

The antics of plantation negroes have held Black America back 60 years, since the Civil Rights Movement with all the “nigga” lyrics and jokes told and sung by Black comedians, rappers, athletes and actors, and the sell out brothers and sisters who are paid not to care.

Even though many believe that it is a “term of endearment,” and a way for Blacks to show their love for one another, (as spouted by a whitewashed pseudointellectual professor) as long as these innuendos continue, Black America will never shake the negative stereotypes attached to us nor gain a positive sense of self.

As a throwback to the vaudeville skits and samboism that Hollywood attached to Blacks in early entertainment and when television began, today’s entertainers have done nothing more than magnified that image in a self-degrading drive to make money and to feed the insecurities of Blacks who have no positive image of themselves.

Laughing at these fools, lusting after the skank fashion of Black women complete with the attitude and show of soft porn, thug-life brothers, and any other so-called common characteristic of Blacks continue to resurface in Hollywood and into our children’s minds. The voices of Black intellectuals and abolitionist who protest this filth are silenced throughout the land.

White America and others see this portrayal of ourselves, by ourselves, and rest easy, knowing that we continue to carry on and even strengthen the cycle of Jim Crowism and the ghettoized mentality. They know that as long as they can offer them enough money to carry the images on, there will be a brown-nose brother or sister willing to take it.

Where are the true Black leaders? Where is the Hierarchy of Black development? Where are the hard-core rappers, activist, and politicians who swear to improve or give back to the Black community where it pertains to our national image and well-being?

They are lying up watching and laughing, believing that Blacks will be this way, remain this way because it is our nature. Bull. This is not the nature of Blacks, to further the antics of negro vaudeville. This is the behavior adopted by reason of years of economic and media exploitation. And it seems that when these people reach a certain income level, they are paid more to quit the struggle and move on.

The Black mind and soul are more than what Hollywood portrays, even from the Black icons who play these roles. Laughter is good and makes life easier to live, but when it undermines any positive image Black America has worked hard to build, there is nothing funny about it.