Police back Republican candidates in U.S. midterms, even those at Jan. 6 riot

(Reuters) - The Wisconsin Fraternal Order of Police has endorsed some Democratic candidates in past elections. But this year, in each of the 13 races it weighed in on, the union decided Republicans would be more forceful champions of law enforcement.

Police back Republican candidates in U.S. midterms, even those at Jan. 6 riot

The fascists now have more police unions on their side. Police unions across the country are backing all Republican candidates in the midterms because they feel they would support them more than the Democrats.

The scary part is they know they will back them because as stated in the article, “Republicans had offered greater support to police in the wake of 2020 protests over police killings of Black people.”

Sentence structure may seem to legitimize this statement to make it make sense, but Black people can read very well between the lines and it means what it means; Republicans are all for police killing Black people so the police will vote for them.

The “Defund the Police” chants, falsely amplified by the right-wing propaganda networks, have brainwashed white voters that the Democrats want to take away funding from the police instead of limited funding for military grade weaponry and riot control forces and train them on de-escalation tactics instead.

Black America needs to prepare for more of the same terrorism from American racists. But there is hope. Please read our spiritual warning to white America.

Reuters spoke to nine police unions and trade associations across the United States ahead of Tuesday's midterm elections, of whom six said their members were endorsing more right-wing candidates than in previous elections. The groups said Republicans had offered greater support to police in the wake of 2020 protests over police killings of Black people.



The rightward shift held true even in races where a Republican candidate attended the Jan. 6 rally. More than a dozen candidates who have publicly acknowledged being present at the event – none of whom have been charged with a crime – are running for U.S. Congress, statehouse and statewide offices.

Six of those candidates received police endorsements, a Reuters review found. In interviews, union representatives said they felt comfortable backing them because there was no proof they broke any law or supported the violence that ensued.

Democratic calls for police reform after the 2020 protests, on the other hand, had too often implied that all officers were unfit, said Andrea Edmiston, a spokesperson for the National Association of Police Organizations (NAPO), which represents about 241,000 officers around the United States.

The North Carolina Sheriff Police Alliance added a new requirement for candidates who wanted their endorsement this year: proof that they denounced the "defund the police" movement that became a rallying cry for some on the left calling for law enforcement reform after the 2020 protests.

Although Democrats around the country have sought to distance themselves from the movement, none in North Carolina provided sufficient proof that they had denounced it, said Rickey Padgett, the group's state secretary.

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